Care home fees information

The amount you will have to pay towards your care-home costs is based on your financial circumstances.

The government decides the rules and limits that apply.

We will carry out a financial assessment to find out how much financial help you will be entitled to from us and how much you will have to pay towards the cost of your care-home fees. Alternatively you can use our financial assessment online form.

We will assess your financial circumstances before you go to live in the care home.

If you have more than £28,000 (the 2019/2020 rate) in savings or property, you will not qualify for financial help from us and you will have to pay the whole cost of your care, less any entitlement to free personal care or nursing care (or both).

If you are in this position, visit the What if my capital is above the upper limit for financial help? section.

You do not need to have a financial assessment if you do not want to.

If you choose not to have the assessment, you will not qualify for financial help.

Working out your income

We will take most of your income into account as being available to meet the cost of the care home.

Your income includes most state benefits and any other pensions you receive.

However, we do not take certain types of income into account.

The following are some examples of income, which we do not take into account:

  • £10 a week of armed forces compensation payments, war disablement, war widow’s or war widower’s pensions
  • War widow’s special payment
  • Personal Independence Payment (mobility part)
  • Disability Living Allowance (mobility component)

For respite care, we also ignore the following.

  • Attendance Allowance
  • Personal Independence Payment (daily living part)
  • Disability Living Allowance (care component)
  • Personal expenses allowance

Everyone in a care home must be left with an amount of money for their personal expenses.

The personal expenses allowance is there so you can have money to spend as you like (for example, on toiletries and other minor items).

Each year the government decides the amount. You must not use it as part of your contribution towards fees.

The personal allowance for 2019/2020 is £27.75 a week.

We may also be able to include up to another £6.50 a week (for single people) and £9.70 a week (for couples) in your personal allowance.

The financial assessor can give you advice about this.

What counts as capital?

Capital includes money held in: 

  • bank or building-society accounts, including current accounts
  • cash
  • investment bonds and investment accounts
  • stocks and shares
  • trust funds
  • Premium Bonds
  • National Savings Certificates
  • property

Whose capital do you take into account?

We only count the capital owned by the person going into care.

If you have any joint capital, (for example, a joint bank account or investment with your husband, wife or partner) we will treat you as owning half of the capital or investment.

If you have a joint account with someone who is not your husband, wife or partner, we may need to see evidence of who owns the capital.

Capital limits

The government set ‘capital limits’ which are reviewed every year.

The lower capital limit is currently £17,500 and the upper capital limit is currently £28,000 (2019/2020 financial year).

The capital limits apply whether you are a temporary or permanent resident in a care home.

Tariff income

If you have capital between the capital limits (between £17,500 and £28,000) we say this capital produces a ‘tariff income’.

This means we take into account £1 for every £250 (or part of £250), between these limits to pay towards your care costs.

We then add your tariff amount to your normal weekly income:

Example 1 – if you have £18,750 in capital, we will assess you as having a tariff income of £5 a week. We do not take the first £17,500 into account. This leaves a balance of £1250. To take account of £1 for every £250 in this balance, we divide this by £250, which is £5.

Example 2 – if you have £18,450 in capital, your tariff income will be £4 a week. Ignoring the first £17,500 leaves a balance of £950. We divide this by £250, which is £3 with £200 left over. We treat this £200 as ‘part of £250’, so your tariff income will be £4.

What about my ongoing financial commitments?

When we do the assessment, we may allow for ongoing financial commitments (such as life assurance payments) you have to pay and we can add an amount for these to your personal expenses allowance. The financial assessor can give you advice about this.

Whether or not you have to sell your home depends on your circumstances.

The information below is about the home you normally live in.

If you own any other property, we will count it as capital. If you are in respite care, we do not count the value of the home you normally live in as capital.

However, we may count the value of your normal home as capital if you are going into a care home permanently.

We also ignore the value of the house you normally live in, if any of the following people live in it:

  • Your partner, unless you are separated or divorced from them.
  • A relative who is over 60.
  • A relative under 16 who you are responsible for.
  • A lone (single) parent who you are separated or divorced from.
  • A relative who is incapacitated. By ‘incapacitated’ we mean someone who qualifies for a state benefit because of a medical condition or someone who has been assessed by a doctor as incapacitated but does not qualify for a state benefit.) A relative means:
    • a parent or parent-in-law
    • a son or son-in-law
    • a daughter or daughter-in-law
    • a step-parent
    • a stepson or stepdaughter
    • a brother or sister
    • a grandparent or grandchild
    • an uncle or aunt
    • a nephew or niece
    • the partner of any of the relatives listed above.

The ‘12-week disregard’

If you move into a care home permanently, the care home becomes your normal home.

If we are not going to ignore (disregard) the value of your house because none of the circumstances set out above apply to you, we still ignore the value of your home for the first 12 weeks.

This is to allow you time to consider the options available to you for paying the costs of your care.

If you expect your stay in a care home to be respite and it then becomes permanent, we ignore the value of your home during the respite period and then for 12 weeks from the date you become a permanent resident.

After this 12-week period ends, we will count the value of your home as capital, less any debt secured on it (such as a mortgage) and less the costs of selling your home.

Putting off payments

After the 12 week period, you can apply to us for ‘deferred payments’.

This means you can put off (defer) making part of your payments if you cannot (or do not want to) sell your home immediately and:

  • we have assessed that your other capital is at, or less than the lower capital limit, the limit is £17,500 for 2019/2020
  • you cannot meet the full cost of the payments from your income
  • you are prepared to grant a standard security (see the note below) against your home
  • the value of your interest in your home is enough to meet our reasonable estimate of the total deferred payment
  • we think you will still be able to pay your mortgage (if you have one) as well as any care home fees.

If we accept your application, we will provide financial help to pay for your care home fees, which you must agree to repay either when your house is sold, or from your estate when you die.

If you defer making part of your payments, we will still expect you to contribute an assessed amount from your income towards your care-home fees.

Note: A standard security is also known as a mortgage deed. Granting a standard security means that, when you do sell your home, the council can reclaim from you the payments you deferred.

Example: The current approved standard rate for nursing care for people 65 or over in Angus is £714.90 a week. We will pay the first £257 a week (using the free personal and nursing care payment). This leaves £457.90 a week to pay for your accommodation costs. You would normally have to pay this whole balance from your own income and capital.

However, if you apply to defer making the payments, we work out how much we expect you to pay as follows:

  • First, we work out your weekly income. Your pensions and any income you receive from renting out your house is taken into account in the financial assessment.

For example: If you get £161.20 a week from your State Pension and £66.88 a week from renting out your house, your income will be £228.08. We will ignore £27 from this amount for your personal expenses. This leaves £201.08, which we call your ‘available income’.

We expect you to put your available income towards paying for your care home fees. So we take your available income (£201.08) from the accommodation costs (£457.90) which leaves a balance of £256.82 a week to pay (£13,354.64 a year).

We will pay this for you and treat it as a debt.

Before we accept your application to defer making your care home payments, you must show us proof that you own your home and proof of any debts secured on it.

If you are acting on behalf of someone going into a care home, you must provide proof that you have full legal authority to act on their behalf.

We will treat the deferred payment as a debt and secure it on your home using a ‘standard security’.

You will also need to appoint a solicitor and there will be costs involved in this, which you will need to pay.

We will decide whether or not you are entitled to defer making your payments.

When considering your application to defer payment, we take into account all your circumstances, including:

  • your age and health
  • how long you want to defer making payments for
  • the value of your home
  • whether there are any other debts secured on your home.

We must also take into account the funds available to us for making deferred payments.

We do not charge interest on the deferred payments until you end the agreement or until 56 days after you die.

We will then charge interest at a reasonable rate, which we will decide.

The free personal care and nursing-care payments we make do not count as deferred payments and we will not ask you to pay these back.

If you want to talk to us because you want to put off (defer) your payments, please phone ACCESSLine on 03452 777 778,  or write to  Angus Council, Financial Assessment Team, PO Box 6621, Arbroath DD11 9AX.

Transferring the title of my home to someone else

If you are going into a care home permanently, as part of the financial assessment we will ask you if you own (or have ever owned) the house you live in or recently lived in.

If you previously owned a house but no longer do so, we must look at why the change of ownership happened.

We must find out whether you gave away or transferred ownership of your home (or any other capital) to avoid paying the care home fees.

We will consider each case in detail and will get an opinion from our lawyers.

Temporary financial help while you sell your home. We can offer you temporary financial help towards your care home fees if the 12 week period has ended and:

  • your home is on the market but has not been sold yet
  • we have assessed that your other capital is less than the upper capital limit
  • you cannot meet the full cost of the care home from your income. You must agree to pay us back when you sell your home

We will place a security over your home called a ‘charging order’. This means that when your house is eventually sold we can make sure you pay back our temporary financial help. We will still expect you to contribute an amount from your income towards your care-home fees while we are providing temporary financial help.

We will work out how much we expect you to pay in the same way as if you had applied to defer your care-home payments. 

If you are moving into a care home for temporary care and your partner is staying at home.

If you have a partner and you are going into a care home for temporary care, we will only assess your financial circumstances – not your partner’s.

This means that the contribution we ask you to pay will be based only on your income and capital.

If you are going into care and your partner is staying at home, the financial assessor will normally ask about their income.

This is only to make sure that they are left with enough money to live on while you are in the care home.

Currently, we make sure that your partner is left with at least £167.25 a week.

If you are moving into a care home permanently and your partner is staying at home

Pensions

If you are moving into a care home permanently and you have an occupational pension or a private pension or you receive a payment from a retirement annuity contract, we can ignore 50% of this if you choose to give this amount to your partner at home.

This may not always benefit your partner, as it can affect other state benefits they may get.

Benefits

If you are one of a couple and you are going into a care home permanently, we will treat you and your partner as two single people for the purpose of working out your benefits.

This can sometimes mean complicated changes to your benefits. This may involve telling different benefit offices about your change of circumstances, and making new benefit claims.

The financial assessor can help you to do this.

Splitting joint capital

We assess joint capital (capital that you and your partner own together) as being equally owned between you.

It may be worth separating your capital if:

  • your share of joint capital is £28,000 or over
  • you are entering a care home permanently
  • your partner is staying at home.

For example: you and your partner have joint capital worth £62,500 we assess your share as half of this (£31,250), which is £3,250 above the upper capital limit to quality for financial help. If you then use £3250 of your capital to pay for your care, you still may not qualify for financial help because your share of the capital that is left may still be higher than the upper capital limit.

Capital (not separated) £62,500 - £3,250 =  £59,250

Your half share of the £59,250 would be £29,652, which is still £1625 above the limit to qualify for financial help.

If you separated the capital, your share of the joint capital would still be £31,250 (half of £62,500), which would still be £3,250 above the upper limit to qualify for financial help. However, if you then use £3,250 of your capital to pay for your care, your capital will reduce to £28,000 because we do not take your partner’s share into account.

Capital (separated) £31,250 -  £3,250 = £28,000

Because we only assess your share of the capital, your capital has reduced to the upper limit (£28,000) and you qualify for financial help. This example shows that if you do not separate your capital, you may have to use some of your partner’s share of your capital to pay for your care before you qualify for financial help.

It may not be easy to separate joint capital, depending upon the type of investment.

You should get advice about this from an independent person, such as a solicitor or the Citizen’s Advice Bureau.

How we assess your financial circumstances if you and your partner are both moving into a care home permanently

If you and your partner both need to go into a care home, we will treat you as two separate service users even if you will be living together in the same room.

You may each be entitled to financial help from us and we will assess each of you separately to decide whether you qualify for free personal-care or nursing-care payments (or both), as well as any extra financial help.

Our assessment will be based on your individual income and capital, including your share of any joint capital. If you sell your jointly owned home, we will share the money from the sale equally between you for the financial assessment.

Benefits

The Department for Work and Pensions will also treat you as two separate customers.

They will assess your income and capital separately, even if you are sharing the same room in the care home.

You will need to claim benefits separately. The financial assessor can advise you to claim the benefits you are entitled to.

What happens to your benefits when you move into a care home?

State Pension and Incapacity Benefit

Your State Pension and Incapacity Benefit will continue to be paid at your normal rate when you are living in a care home.

Attendance Allowance

If you receive any financial help from us with your care home fees, your Attendance Allowance will stop 28 days after you move into the care home.

You may lose it sooner if you were in hospital or temporary care before you moved to the care home.

If you are admitted to hospital, discharged from hospital or you move into a care home, you should tell the Attendance Allowance Helpline on 0800 731 0122.

Disability Living Allowance (DLA)/Personal Independence Payment (PIP)

Care/Daily Living component - The care component of DLA and the daily living component of PIP is treated in the same way as Attendance Allowance as noted above.

Mobility component - You will continue to receive the mobility component of DLA when you move into a care home.

If you were in hospital for more than 28 days before moving into a care home, your mobility component payment should have stopped. If this is the case, when you are discharged from hospital you should contact the PIP enquiry line on 0800 121 4433, or visit www.gov.uk.

They will then start paying the mobility component again.

Carer’s Allowance

Any Carer’s Allowance you are entitled to (even if you are not paid it because of another benefit you receive) stops at the same time as the Attendance Allowance or DLA/PIP (care component).

Universal Credit

You may be entitled to Universal Credit if you move into a care home permanently, but this depends on your age. 

If you are moving into a care home permanently and you already receive Universal Credit, you should notify the Department for Work and Pensions by updating your online journal.

Pension Credit

You may be entitled to Pension Credit if you move into a care home permanently, but this depends on your age. 

If you are moving into a care home permanently and you already receive Pension Credit, you should tell the Department for Work and Pensions that your circumstances have changed by phoning the Pension Service helpline on 0800 731 0469. 

Housing Benefit/Council Tax Reduction

You can continue to qualify for Housing Benefit/Council Tax Reduction during any temporary periods in a care home.

You are not entitled to Housing Benefit/Council Tax Reduction once you move into a care home permanently.

You must notify the Housing Benefit/Council Tax Reduction office. You can do this on our report a change in circumstances page.

Council Tax

If you live alone and you go into a care home permanently, your home may be exempt from Council Tax (you may not have to pay any Council Tax on it).

You should notify the council via our report a change in circumstances page.

If you are able to, you can continue to manage your own money.

If you are not able to act for yourself, you can authorise someone else to act as your ‘appointee’.

An appointee is a person authorised by the Secretary of State to act on your behalf in relation to your benefits. The appointee is usually a relative, friend or solicitor.

However, if you cannot name an appointee, you can ask us to act as your appointee.

The appointee is responsible for:

  • claiming benefits on your behalf and filling in all the relevant application forms
  • making sure your benefits are used for the things they are meant to be used for
  • making sure you get the most out of your benefits
  • telling the Department for Work and Pensions about any changes in your circumstances which may affect the benefits you get
  • making any payments for you, including paying your care-home fees
  • making sure you receive your personal expenses allowance

If you want to arrange for an appointee to act on your behalf, visit GOV.UK's become an appointee for someone claiming benefits page for more information. If your appointee fails to meet their responsibilities, we may ask the Department for Work and Pensions to cancel the arrangement.

An appointee can only deal with your benefits. If you have other income (for example, a works pension), you will need to get a separate authorisation for somebody to deal with this income.

This authorisation is called a continuing (financial) power of attorney. If you have given someone continuing (financial) power of attorney, that person can manage your finances even if you still have the mental ability to do so, but prefer the person named on the power of attorney to act for you.

You can only give power of attorney if you have the mental ability to grant it. Your mental ability will be assessed through a solicitor, in line with the guidance given in the Adults with Incapacity (Scotland) Act 2000. This makes sure your interests are protected and that people do not take advantage of you financially.

For more information visit the Power of Attorney in Scotland website.

It is our responsibility to make sure that the person named on your power of attorney acts in your best interests. If we think they are not acting in your best interests, we will ask for their power of attorney to be withdrawn as soon as possible.

If you are not able to manage your finances and you do not have the mental ability to arrange for someone else to act on your behalf, the Office of the Public Guardian (Scotland) can authorise somebody (a relative, friend or solicitor) to deal with your funds. This authorisation is called ‘guardianship’.

For more information or to apply for guardianship, visit the public guardian website.

We work out how much financial help we can give you by using the financial information you give us.

Your contribution is based on your capital and the income you expect to receive when you move into the care home. Your income in the care home may be different from the amount you received before going into care.

You will have to pay towards your care-home fees from the date you move into the care home. If you go into hospital, your room at the care home will be kept and you will still have to pay your contribution during your time in hospital.

Care homes we run

If you move into a care home run by us, you must pay your contribution direct to us. Every 28 days, we will send you an invoice for your contribution towards your care-home fees.

You can pay your invoice for your care home contribution at the bank, Post Office or Paypoint.

The Post Office will accept payment by cash, cheque or debit card. Paypoint accepts cash and some outlets will take card payments. You cannot pay by cheque at a Paypoint.

You can also make payments over the phone with a debit or credit card. The phone number is on the back of the invoice.

If you are moving into a care home permanently, you can choose to pay us by four weekly Direct Debit. Call the finance team on 01241 465333 for a Direct Debit form.

Independent care homes in Angus

If you move into an independent care home in Angus, we will pay the agreed cost direct to the home.

You must pay your contribution directly to us. If you are moving into a care home permanently, you can choose to pay us by four weekly Direct Debit. Call the finance team on 01241 465333 for a Direct Debit form.

Alternatively, we can send you an invoice for your contribution towards your care-home fees every 28 days.

You can pay your invoice for your care home contribution at the bank, Post Office or Paypoint. The Post Office will accept payment by cash, cheque or debit card.

Paypoint accepts cash and some outlets will take card payments. You cannot pay by cheque at a Paypoint. You can also make payments over the phone with a debit or credit card. The phone number is on the back of the invoice.

Independent care homes outwith Angus

If you move into a care home outwith Angus, you will pay your contribution to the care home direct.

We also make our contribution direct to the care home. You, or your representative, should contact the home to find out the most suitable way of making payments (for example, direct from your bank).

We will contact you and the home to let you know the weekly rate, and from what date you will have to pay your contribution.

Can I choose a more expensive care home?

We will normally pay up to a standard amount (called an ‘approved rate’) when you move into a care home.

The amount of the approved rate depends on whether you will receive residential or nursing care. We normally increase the approved rates each April.

If you choose a care home, which is more expensive than the approved rate, your family will have to make up the difference between the approved rate and the actual charge.

If you are going to receive help from your family to pay the extra cost, it is vital that they can afford this arrangement and that it will last.

The care home will ask your family to sign a separate contract agreeing to pay the extra amount.

If your family cannot make the extra payments for any reason, we cannot take responsibility for this amount.

You may then need to move to a less expensive care home (or a less expensive room in the care home you are already in).

Can I live in a care home outside Angus

If you normally live in Angus and we have assessed that you need care, you can ask us to help you move to a care home in another part of the UK, perhaps to be closer to your family.

In this situation, we will continue to pay your entitlement to free personal care or nursing care (or both) and any extra financial help we have offered you.

If our assessment shows you have more capital than the upper limit (currently £28,000), you will not qualify for financial help from us.

This will not affect any entitlement you have to free personal care or nursing care. If you have more capital than the upper limit, you will have to pay your care home fees until your capital falls below the upper limit.

Once this happens, you will qualify for financial help from us.

What counts as capital?

Capital includes money held in:

  • bank or building society accounts including current accounts
  • cash
  • investment bonds and investment accounts
  • stocks and shares
  • trust funds
  • Premium Bonds
  • National Savings Certificates;
  • property

Whose capital do you take into account?

We only count the capital owned by the person going into care. If you have any joint capital, (for example, a joint bank account or investment with your husband, wife or partner) we will treat you as owning half of the capital or investment.

If you have a joint account with someone who is not your husband, wife or partner, we may need to see evidence of who owns the capital.

What will my care home fees be if my capital is above the upper limit for financial assistance?

If you are only receiving free personal care and nursing care payments from us to assist with your care home fees, you should always ask the home how much the fees would be.

Some homes have different fees for people who are meeting the cost of the care home themselves. In these care homes, you will often have to pay a much higher amount than our ‘approved rate’, which is the most we will pay for a place in a care home.

It is important to find out whether the care home will reduce their charge to our approved rate once your capital falls to below £28,000. Once your capital falls to below £28,000, we will normally only provide financial help up to our approved rate for care homes.

Our approved placement standard rates are currently:

  • £614.07 or £616.57 for a placement in a residential home depending on the most recent Quality Gradings awarded to the home by the Scottish Commission for the Regulation of Care.
  • £714,90 or £717.40 for a placement in a nursing home depending on the most recent Quality Gradings awarded to the home by the Scottish Commission for the Regulation of Care.

What can I spend my money on?

When you live permanently in a care home, your greatest expense will be your care home fees.

You may want to buy items for your room, such as furniture, carpets, a TV and a phone. If you do spend money on this type of thing, you should keep the receipts so we can take them into account if we assess your finances again.

You may also have to regularly spend money on things like clothes, toiletries, sweets, drinks, trips, and hairdressing. If you later apply for financial help from us, we will need to make sure your capital has reduced at a reasonable rate and that you are not trying to avoid having to pay care home fees.

Can I give my capital away?

If you give gifts of money, we may decide you have done so to avoid having to pay care home fees.

There is no specific amount that you are allowed to give away.

However, if you apply for financial help from us and your total yearly spending (after taking off care home fees) is more than £2,500 we will ask you what you spent the money on, and decide whether you had spent it to avoid or reduce your contribution to care home fees.

We will look carefully at each case, taking account of all your circumstances.

In particular, we will look at:

  • the amounts spent or given away
  • the reasons for the spending or gift
  • how often any gifts were given.

What do I do when my capital falls to the upper limit?

When your capital has almost fallen to the upper limit for financial help, you should apply to us for financial help.

Although you will not be entitled to help until your capital reduces to the upper limit, claiming early makes sure you get the financial help you are entitled to as soon as possible.

You should contact the financial assessment team to ask them to assess your financial circumstances.

As part of the assessment, we will decide whether your capital has reduced at a reasonable rate. We will need to see proof of the capital you had when you moved into the care home as well as your current capital balance.

You should keep a record of your capital, income, and spending, for example:

  • details of the proceeds from selling your home
  • copies of bank statements
  • any bills or debts which you used your capital to pay

Reducing your capital to avoid having to pay care-home fees

Deliberately reducing your capital to avoid paying your contribution to care home fees is called ‘deprivation of capital’.

It is a complicated area, so if you are affected by these rules you should get independent advice from a solicitor.

The following are examples of deprivation of capital.

  • giving away a large lump sum of money as a gift
  • giving away property by transferring the title deeds to someone without receiving any money in return
  • putting money into a trust

Why do you ask about my capital?

Whether or not you qualify for financial help from us depends on your financial circumstances.

By law, we must consider whether you have deliberately reduced your capital to qualify for this financial help.

How does deprivation of capital affect my application for financial help?

If we decide that you have deliberately reduced your capital to qualify for financial help from us, we may reduce or refuse financial help towards the cost of your care home fees.

What if I used to own a house or flat?

If your name was on the title deed of a house or flat, we must find out why your name has been removed from the title deed. We will pass this information to our solicitors. They will tell us whether they think we should include the value of the house or flat in our financial assessment.

What if someone else paid for the house or flat?

If someone else paid for the house or flat but the title deeds were registered in your name, we will have to consider the reasons why someone else paid for the house so that we can decide whether we need to include its value in our assessment. You will have to provide proof that someone else paid for the house or flat.

If you decide that deprivation of capital has happened, how do you assess the value of the capital involved?

If the deprivation of capital involves a property, we work out its value using its value on the open market at the time it was transferred less 10%.

Example: You gave away a property valued at £75,000 one year before you went into a care-home, and you did not receive any money in return.

We assess that you should have received £67,500, which is £75,000 less 10%.

Value of the property at the time it was transferred £75,000 Less 10% - £7,500 Assessed value = £67,500

We call the assessed value of capital you have given away ‘notional capital’.

What is notional capital?

Notional capital is capital you are treated as still having even though you no longer actually have it.

‘Notional capital’ includes deprivation of capital through selling your property.

For example, if your house was valued at £100,000 and you have sold it for £10,000, we would treat you as having £90,000 in notional capital and £10,000 in actual capital. If your actual capital and notional capital added together are more than the upper capital limit, you will not be able to receive financial help from us.

Will I be able to get financial help in the future?

As long as you give us the information we need, we will be able to work out how long it will take for your capital to fall to below the upper limit (currently £28,000).

Your ‘assessed capital’ is how much ‘actual’ and ‘notional’ capital you have over the upper limit.

We work out how much of your assessed capital you will use to pay your care-home fees.

To work out the time we think you will qualify for financial help, the amount you have above the upper limit is divided by the amount of capital you will use to pay your care-home fees.

Assessed capital £73,000(£67,500 notional, £5,500 actual) Upper capital limit - £28,000 Capital above the upper limit £45,000.

Your capital for care home fees:

Your income Fee calculation
Retirement pension £116.46
Work pension £81.20
Total £197.66
Less personal allowance £27
Available income £170.66

 

Care home fees Fee calculation
Cost of care home £714.90
Less free personal and nursing care £257
Total £457.90
Less available income £170.66
Amount of capital for care home fees £287.24

 

Capital above the upper limit (£45,000) ÷ by amount of capital for care-home fees (£287.24) = 157 weeks. So, you would have to pay the full cost of your care-home fees for 157 weeks. 

When your capital is getting near the upper limit, you can apply to us for financial help. You should contact the financial assessment team who will assess your finances and let you know if you qualify for help.

Can I challenge your decision about deprivation?

You, or a person acting on your behalf, may disagree with our decision that you have reduced your capital to reduce your contribution to your care-home fees. If this is the case, you or your representative can ask us to review our decision by sending your reasons to The Financial Assessment Team, PO Box 6621, Arbroath, DD11 9AX.

Free personal care and nursing care payments were introduced in 2002. To qualify for free personal care, you must be:

  • 18 or over
  • assessed by us as needing personal care (for example, you have difficulty bathing, dressing, eating or getting to the toilet).

To qualify for free nursing care you must be:

  • 18 or over
  • assessed by us as needing nursing care (for example, you need a qualified nurse to monitor your condition).

We provide:

  • £177 a week for personal care
  • £80 a week for nursing care

Payments for free personal and nursing care do not depend on your financial circumstances. We will make them no matter what income and capital you have.

How are payments for free personal care and nursing care paid?

We pay the care home directly on your behalf.

Does anything affect these payments?

If you are admitted to hospital from a care home, we will stop free personal care and nursing care payments after 14 days and you will have to pay the full cost of your care home fees.

If you return to hospital again within 52 weeks, we will stop your free personal-care or nursing care payments immediately.

You have the right to make a complaint if you are unhappy about any part of our service, and to have your complaint investigated. Visit our making a complaint or comment about our services page for more information.